KCM ENVIRO

Services
We Offer

Founded in 2014, KCM Environmental Services has grown considerably since interception. With more than a decade of experience in the environmental monitoring and compliance field from our team, our footprint covers industries across South Africa.

What We Do

Our clients can feel confident that we deliver accurate results and quality services.

We achieve this by:
• Implementing a quality management system.

• Our testing and reporting is performed solely by Trained Professionals.

• We only use laboratories that are SANAS accredited.

• Our highly sophisticated equipment has been imported from the USA and Germany and conforms to the methods outlined by the Air Quality Act.

• We were placed second in the country for the SAB Kickstart Boost Program in 2018 out of 3000 applicants.

Additional Environmental Services Offered 

• Environmental Impact Assessments i.e.  Basic Assessments, and  Scoping and Environmental Impact Reports 

• Environmental Management Programmes • Section 24(g) applications 

• Water Use License Applications • Environmental Screening and Feasibility Assessments 

• Environmental Site Assessments • Mining Permits • Additional Permits i.e. DAFF, Heritage, etc.

• Maintenance Management Programmes 

• Appointment and Management of Specialist Studies 

•Environmental Compliance Monitoring (ECO services) 

Environmental Induction Training

 All environmental services will be undertaken in strict accordance with the relevant Environmental Legislations. KCM Environmental will provide experienced handling and management of all aspects of the abovementioned environmental services. We also have access to a variety of specialists to support the environmental services we undertake.

KCM Environmental assists clients to meet their legal requirements in terms of the National

Environmental Management: Air Quality Act, No.39 of 2004 to monitor ambient air.

Our ambient air quality monitoring services includes:

  • Ammonia (NH3)
  • Hydrogen Fluoride (HF)
  • Hydrogen Chloride (HCl)
  • Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)
  • Sulphur Dioxide (SO2)
  • Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S)
  • BTEX (Benzene, Toluene, Ethyl Benzene, Xylene)
  • Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)
  • Ozone (O3)

KCM Environmental Services follows the American Society for Testing and Materials Standard method for the collection and analysis of dust fall out (ASTM D1739:1970). This method is accepted by the Department of Environmental Affairs, National Environmental Management: Air Quality Act, 2004. 

Dust Fallout Monitoring covers the following procedure:

  • Collection and measuring of dust-fall, by means of employing a simple device comprising of a cylindrical container (at least 150mm in diameter, and twice as deep as the diameter) that is exposed for one calendar month ±2 days. 
  • The bucket holder is attached to a steel pole, so that the bucket rim is 2m above ground level. 
  • The pole can be attached directly to a fence post, can be concreted in, or stabilised using three tent pegs and rope.

We perform these surveys in accordance with SANS 10103:2008, “The Measurement and Rating of Environmental Noise with respect to Annoyance and to Speech Communication. Ambient sound level measurements are proposed to be undertaken at various points along the perimeter of the property and in the surrounding community. Daytime and night-time measurements being undertaken during the prescribed timeframes in SANS 10103:2008, which specifies daytime monitoring between 06:00 and 22:00, and night-time monitoring between 22:00 and 06:00.

KCM Environmental provides professional stationary source emissions testing services of boilers, burners, incinerators, and various other manufacturing processes. Our sophisticated equipment, such as our TESTO 340 Flue Gas Analyses from Germany and Clean Air Express train assembled in America, as well as experienced staff ensures a premier service for our clients. We strive to make all test methods and data available which ensure complete transparency and leaves clients feeling confident that they have test results of integrity. We specialize in source emission testing of We work together with government regulations to ensure that the data and format of reports are to the satisfaction of all parties.

Source emission testing is conducted for various reasons, some of which include:

  • Compliance with testing requirements as described in atmospheric emission license and government regulations.
  • The development of precise Emission Inventories and Emission Factors
  • To design and implement clean air technology systems
  • To determine pollutant impacts from specific sources
  • Air Pollution Modelling

KCM Environmental uses the following US EPA sampling which are accepted by the National Environmental Management Act: Air Quality Act, 2004 (Act no. 39 of 2004):

US EPA Pollutants

Pollutants

Method 1 – 5

Method 1 – 5 Determination of particulate emissions from stationary sources

Method 6

Method 6 Determination of SO2 emissions from stationary sources

Method 6 C

Method 6 C Determination of SO2 emissions from stationary sources (analyser

Method 7 E

Method 7 E Determination of NOX emissions from stationary sources

Method 8

Method 8 Determination of sulphuric acid mist and sulphur dioxide

Method 18

Method 18 Measurement of gaseous organic compound emissions by GC

Method 23

Method 23 Measurement of dioxins and furans emissions from stationary

Method 26

Method 26 Determination of HCl emissions from stationary sources

Method 26 A

Method 26 A Determination of hydrogen halide and halogen emissions

Method 29

Method 29 Determination of metals emissions from stationary sources

KCM understands that the Air Emissions License (AEL) application is not a straightforward process and assists clients with their application process to the relevant municipalities. Industries who were previously in possession of certificates of registration issued under the Atmospheric Pollution Prevention Act (APPA) was required to apply for an Air Emissions licence (AEL) in terms of the National Environmental Management Act: Air Quality Act (NEMA: AQA). It is an offence for industries to operate a listed activity without an Air Emissions Licence.

The development of the South African Atmospheric Emission Licencing and Inventory Portal (SAAELIP) accommodates both the System for National Atmospheric Emission Licencing (SNAEL) and the National Atmospheric Emission Inventory System (NAEIS). NAEIS is an internet-based emissions reporting system that allows facilities to report their emissions on an annual basis. In terms of the National Atmospheric Emission Reporting Regulations, NAEIS regulates the reporting of data and information from sources of atmospheric emissions within South Africa for the purpose of compiling a National Atmospheric Emission Inventory profile. 

KCM has extensive experience in undertaking the following:

  • AEL Application Process
  • SAAELIP
  • AEL compliance audits
  • AEL Annual Reporting
  • NAEIS updates and Reporting

We offer a service of measuring opacity from diesel vehicle engine exhausts. KCM Environmental has procured a new Diesel Exhaust Smoke meter which caters for all diesel driven vehicles (cars, vans, trucks, buses, plus light and heavy plant machinery). 

The equipment is mobile; hence the testing is conveniently conducted on your site and it is internationally recognised and approved by VOSA for MOT testing in the UK. Diesel vehicle exhaust emissions are governed by the National Environmental Management, 1998 (Act 107 Of 1998), Model Air Quality Management By-Law for Easy Adoption and Adaptation by Municipalities. In addition to the government regulations, many companies perform these tests in compliance for their ISO 14001 certification.

We perform proficient Legionella/Water Hygiene monitoring in line with local and internationally recognised standards and that it is also an essential risk specific management practice which provides a critical evaluation of current risk control and mitigation programs.

Legionella is identified as a “Group 2, HBA (Hazardous Biological Agent)” within the South African Regulations for Hazardous Biological Agents (pg 14). The regulation falls within the realms of the Occupational Health & Safety Act, No. 85 of 1993, (OHS Act) and ultimately demands the acceptance of responsibility for the control of exposure of individuals to Legionella. In turn the HBA Regulations highlight the need for risk assessment, monitoring, adequate training, and information as well as record keeping.

Air Dispersion Modelling is an essential tool in air quality management for providing the link between environmental effects and discharges to the air.

KCM performs this service for all industries requiring it, here is how:

  • The model forms part of a mathematical simulation of how air pollutants disperse in the ambient atmosphere and is performed by our skilled staff with computer programs, namely AERMOD. The programs include algorithms to solve the mathematical equations that govern the pollutant dispersion.
  • The models are typically employed to determine whether existing or proposed new industrial facilities are or will follow the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

Environmental waste management in South Africa is governed in terms of the National Environmental Management: Waste Act 2008 (Act 59 of 2008), as amended by the National Environmental Management: Waste Amendment Act (26 of 2014). The Waste Act promotes the waste management hierarchy to reduce the amount of waste going into landfill, through waste avoidance, reduction, re-use, recycling, recovery, treatment, and safe disposal as a last resort. To reduce the impact on human health and the environment the Act also includes minimum requirements and licensing for activities involving the storage, transportation, re-use, recycling, treatment, and disposal of waste.

We can conduct an audit of your current Waste Management Plan to assess the degree of compliance with the National Environmental Management: Waste Act, 2009 and provide recommendations where necessary. The process we follow is:

  • Analyse the quantitative and qualitative waste being generated.
  • Identify the waste management action for each type of waste including re-using, recycling, recovery of disposal.
  • Update the plan to reflect the progress of the project.

Basic Assessment Report (BAR) 

Development / infrastructure / expansion activities that trigger a listed activity in terms of Listing Notice 1 (GNR 327) and Listing Notice 3 (GNR 324) will require a basic assessment process in accordance with the NEMA: EIA Regulations, 2014 (as amended). The environmental process will be undertaken in accordance with the National Environmental Management Act (Act 107 of 1998) and the EIA Regulations, 2014 (as amended 2017).

The Basic Assessment process will strictly follow the requirements of Appendix 1 of the NEMA EIA Regulations 2014, as amended 2017 (GNR 326). The competent authority for the Basic Assessment process is the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) The methodology to be undertaken is as follows:

Process

Steps

Timeframes

SCREENING PROCESS

Step 1: Submission of enquiry form and/or pre-application meeting with the competent authority (CA)

Weeks 1 – 2 (Dependent on availability

SPECIALIST STUDIES

Step 2: In accordance with the requirements laid out by the competent authority – specialists will be appointed to undertake the required studies

Allow 6 – 8 weeks for completion

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION – PHASE 1

Step 3: Commence with the Public Participation Process (this includes the notification of I&APs, adjacent neighbours, placement of signboards, advertisements, BID) 

Allocate 21 days for I&APs to register

INTEGRATION AND ASSESSMENT

Step 4: Compilation of the draft basic assessment report (BAR) and the draft EMPr.

2 weeks – if information is received timeously

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION – PHASE 2

Step 5: Submission of the Draft Basic Assessment Report for commenting period

Allocate 30 days for I&APs to comment

FINALISATION 

Step 6: Collation of comments and responses and finalisation of draft reports

1 – 2 weeks (provided no major changes)

ADMINISTRATION AND SUBMISSION

Step 7: Submission of Final Basic Assessment Report to the competent authority (CA)

Allow 14 days for acknowledgement

ACCEPTANCE/ REJECTION AND APPEALS

Step 8: Issuing of the environmental authorization

Step 9: Notification of I&APs of decision

Step 10: Handling of appeals

CA has 107 days to accept/reject the final BAR. Appeals may take up to 3 months.

Scoping and Environmental Impact Reports (EIR) 

Development / infrastructure / expansion activities that trigger a listed activity in terms of Listing Notice 2 (GNR 325) will require a scoping and environmental impact reporting process in accordance with the NEMA: EIA Regulations, 2014 (as amended). The environmental process will be undertaken in accordance with the National Environmental Management Act (Act 107 of 1998) and the EIA Regulations, 2014 (as amended 2017).

The Scoping & EIR process for the mining right will strictly follow the requirements of Appendices 2 and 3 GNR 326, NEMA EIA Regulations, 2014 (as amended 2017). The table below summarises the steps to be taken:

Process

Steps

Timeframes

SITE VISIT AND BASELINE ASSESSMENT

Step 1: Undertake a site visit with the client to determine the baseline conditions of the site. Undertake a brief baseline screening using GIS Systems.

First Week of appointment (Dependent on availability)

PRE-APPLICATION PROCESS

Step 2: Submission of enquiry form and/or pre-application meeting with the competent authority (CA)

1 week (Dependent on availability)

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION – PHASE 1

Step 3: Commence with the Public Participation Process (this includes the notification of I&APs, adjacent neighbours, placement of signboards, advertisements, BID) 

Allocate 21 days for I&APs to register

SPECIALIST STUDIES

Step 4: In accordance with the requirements laid out by the competent authority – specialists will be appointed to undertake the required studies

Allow 6 – 8 weeks for completion

SCOPING PHASE 1

Step 5: Compilation of the draft scoping report including the baseline assessment undertaken in step 1

2 weeks – if information is received timeously

ADMINISTRATION

Step 6: Submission of application forms to the competent authority (CA)

Allow 2 weeks for acceptance.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PHASE 2

Step 6: Submission of the Scoping Report for commenting period

Allocate 30 days for I&APs to comment

SCOPING PHASE 2

Step 7: Finalisation of scoping report inclusive of comments received.

Step 8: Submission of final scoping report to the competent authority (CA)

The CA has 43 days to accept or reject the Scoping Report.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORTING AND ASSESSMENT

Step 9: compilation of the draft environmental impact report (EIR) and draft environmental management Programme (EMPr)

2 weeks – if information is received timeously

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PHASE 3

Step 10: Submission of the draft environmental impact report (EIR) and draft environmental management Programme (EMPr) for commenting period

Allocate 30 days for I&APs to comment

FINALISATION 

Step 11: Collation of comments and responses and finalisation of draft reports.

1 – 2 weeks (provided no major changes)

ADMINISTRATION AND SUBMISSION

Step 12: Submission of Final EIR and EMPr to the competent authority (CA)

Allow 14 days for acknowledgement

ACCEPTANCE/ REJECTION AND APPEALS

Step 13: Issuing of the environmental authorization

Step 14: Issuing of the mining permit

Step 15: Notification of I&APs of decision

Step 16: Handling of appeals

CA has 107 days to accept/reject the final BAR. Appeals may take up to 3 months.

LICENSE / RIGHT

Step 17: Submission of application to relevant authority for the approval of licenses / rights.

May take up to 3 months.

The EMPr will be compiled in accordance with Appendix 4 of the NEMA: EIA Regulations, 2014 as amended in 2017 (GNR 326).  The purpose of the EMPr is to translate mitigation measures into actions that can be practically implemented during pre-construction, construction and operational activities. The EMPr will address at minimum:

    • Site management,
    • Sand mining activities,
    • Safety and security,
    • Dust and air pollution,
    • Access routes,
    • Vegetation clearing,
    • Storm water management,
    • Waste management (hazardous and general waste),
    • Spillages and contingency plans,
    • Soil erosion,
    • Sensitive environmental areas (including watercourses/wetlands/protected areas and vegetation)
    • Emergency procedures,
    • Environmental awareness training,
    • Storage areas,
    • Cultural environments,
    • Management of environmental impacts,
    • Compliance with environmental management outcomes.

Additionally, the EMPr will also include:

  1. Recommendations made by the appointed specialists;
  2. Definition of roles and responsibilities;
  3. Maps indication no go areas as well as possible areas for the site camp, access roads, etc.

A water use authorisation will apply should an activity be subject to the water uses listed under Section 21 of the National Water Act (Act 36 of 1998). 

Activities that trigger only Section 21 (c) and (i) water uses may require authorisation via a General Authorisation process in terms of GN 44029 (No 509 of 2016), dated August 2016 should the environmental significance be deemed low.

The water use authorisation process is as follows:

Process

Steps

Timeframes

SCREENING PROCESS

Step 1: Identification of S21 water uses and pre-application meeting with the competent authority (CA)

Weeks 1 – 2 (Dependent on availability

SPECIALIST STUDIES

Step 2: In accordance with the requirements laid out by the competent authority – specialists will be appointed to undertake the required studies

Allow 6 – 8 weeks for completion

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Step 3: Commence with the Public Participation Process (this includes the notification of I&APs, adjacent neighbours, placement of signboards, advertisements, BID) 

Allocate 21 days for I&APs to register

INTEGRATION AND ASSESSMENT

Step 4: Compilation of the water use authorisation report (GA / IWWMP)

2 weeks – if information is received timeously

CLIENT / RI&AP REVIEW

Step 5: Client to review GA/ IWWMP. RI&APs that request to view the report will be afforded the opportunity to provide comments during this time. 

2 – 3 weeks.

ADMINISTRATION AND SUBMISSION

Step 5: Submission of water use authorisation report (GA / IWWMP) to the CA.

Allow 14 days for acknowledgement

ACCEPTANCE/ REJECTION AND APPEALS

Step 6: Issuing of the water use authorisation

Step 7: Notification of I&APs of decision

Step 8: Handling of appeals

CA has 300 days to accept/reject the IWWMP. A GA application may take 2 -3 months. 

Appeals may take up to 3 months.

Public participation will be conducted in strict accordance to Chapter 6 of the 2014 NEMA: EIA Regulations (as amended, 2017).

The goal of the Public Participation Process is to transfer project information to the public through consultation, engagement with relevant stakeholders and notifying Interested & Affected Parties (I&APs) during the process. Potential I&APs will be given the opportunity to register as an I&AP to received updates throughout the lifecycle of the project. They will also be given the opportunity to comment on the Draft Basic Assessment Report. 

The public Participation process will run throughout the lifetime of the project to address the comments/concerns of stakeholders and registered I&APs throughout the environmental assessment process.

The public participation process to be conducted is as follows:

  • Phase 1:
  • Provide written notice to adjacent occupiers of the site, the municipal ward councillor, ratepayers association, and any organ of state having jurisdiction in respect of any aspect of the activity via email or hard copy;
  • Place an advert in one local newspaper, and at least one provincial or national newspaper if the activity has or may have an impact that extends beyond the boundaries of the metropolitan or local municipality in which it is or will be undertaken;
  • Placement of notice boards (minimum size 60cm x 42cm) at a place clearly visible to the public at the boundary or on the fence of the site or any alternative site mentioned in the application.
  • Phase 2:
  • Provide registered I&APs/ stakeholders/ organs of state the opportunity to comment on the Draft Basic Assessment report to provide concerns they may have with regards to the projects. These comments will be addressed in the Final Basic Assessment report prior to submission to the Competent Authority.

Environmental screening and feasibility assessments are undertaken to advise the client on any possible environmental requirements for their proposed activity. This process requires:

  1. A rapid assessment of the site in terms of its potential for development. This includes project familiarisation, desktop research, and brief desktop environmental evaluation of the identified site;
  2. GIS mapping of any sensitive environmental features on the site; and
  3. Compilation of an Environmental Screening Report detailing the findings of the preliminary investigations and outlining the necessary legislative requirements which may need to be undertaken by the client in terms of the NEMA EIA Regulations (2014 as amended in 2017), National Water Act (1998), Waste Management Act (2008), National Heritage Resources Act (1999), National Biodiversity Act (2004) and various other relevant legislation and bylaws identified by the Environmental Assessment Practitioner (EAP)

Phase I Environmental Site Assessment 

The Phase I Environmental Site Assessment process will strictly follow the requirements of Designation E1527-13 of the ASTM Standards. In summary, the following steps will be taken:

Phase II Environmental Site Assessment

The Phase I Environmental Site Assessment process will strictly follow the requirements of Designation E1903-11 of the ASTM Standards. Figure 2 summarises the steps to be taken:

 

Mining permits and rights are undertaken in accordance with the requirements of the Mineral Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (Act No. 28 of 2002) and the NEMA: EIA Regulations, 2014 (as amended).  The environmental process to be undertaken will be dependant of the longevity of the mining operation and the size of the site. 

Permits will be applied for in accordance with the relevant legislation and by-laws.

KCM Environmental has access to a wide range of environmental specialists to support the various processes we undertake. These include:

  • Wetland, Riparian and aquatic specialists,
  • Vegetation and alien plant control specialists,
  • Heritage and archaeological Specialists,
  • Hydrological and Geohydrological specialists,
  • Stormwater management and flood line specialists

 Compliance monitoring is undertaken in accordance with the National Environmental Management Act (Act 107 of 1998) and the EIA Regulations, 2014 (as amended 2017). The audit report will be prepared in accordance with Appendix 7 of the NEMA: EIA Regulations, 2014 (as amended in 2017) and the requirements of the relevance license / authorisations

Induction and /or environmental awareness training will be undertaken in accordance with the requirements of the proposed site. The training material and presentation will be compiled in accordance with the requirements of the EA, WULA, EMP/EMPr and additional licenses and/or permits applicable to the site.